The Last Week In Photos

My Last Figure Drawing (not satisfied with her face, but otherwise quite proud of the results):

day one

day two

day three

day four

day five

First Charcoal Portrait:

Gianluca

likenesses (my and Jaimie's work)

Last Gusta Pizza (I did promise):

nommmmmm

Other delicious things from this month’s adventures:

table wine (the good kind)

gnocchi with soft cheese and white truffle oil

homemade raspberry daiquiris

soon-to-be insalata caprese

Piemontese red

Bruschetta

olive oil

And The David:

to see his sheer size

I never said I was mature

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Reflections and Other Images

Today is my last full Monday in Florence. Having just finished another ‘first day’ of figure drawing (this week we’re doing portraits in charcoal – of real people) I gave myself a little time to reflect on my last three weeks here. I’m sure I’ve said this already – but, it’s been an absolute whirlwind of art, tourism, eating, and making friends. I feel like I’ve barely had time for a nap! There’s going to be time for sleep when I’m home, right?

I haven’t been able to update as often as I would have liked, but this week instead of glueing myself to the Internet, I’ve been going to sketch classes:

first sketch class

second week

Going to the Pitti Palace and surrounding gardens for some drawing practice with my new friend, Iona:

Iona sketches a big ol' naked dude

Gallery in the Palazzo Pitti

sketch of lounging park goer

And eating some delicious food (and gelato, because it’s in its own category) – unfortunately I haven’t taken any pictures of these places, but I’ll remedy that situation for my next post, so you’ll have to settle for google pics:

GustaPizza's signature pizza

La Carraia Gelateria

Regarding what I’ve learned, I can already tell that my eye is getting better and my hand is improving as well. This afternoon I noticed I could commit to a line and draw back from the paper to look, only to see that I was more delicate, deliberate, quick and accurate with my pencil. This may seem a little silly, but having done this every day for weeks straight, I can tell you it’s nice to be less frustrated with my work than I am satisfied with what I’ve accomplished! On Friday I think I’ll post a day-by-day picture set of my last figure drawing, so we can all see what work is done in three hours every day, for five days.

This is last Thursday’s figure – the only sitting pose that we labored over. What a trial that was!

All this improvement and frustration and concentration and general *hard work* adds up. I am so glad to have taken a chance on myself, and to have put myself out there! There’s a lot of value in trying something new, whether it is living alone, traveling abroad, or taking a class in something you’ve never really tried before! That’s my advice for today: do something new. You might surprise yourself with how capable you are!

And if nothing else comes of it, you’ll meet new people with new perspectives and experience:

From left: Iona, Sam, and me!

That’s enough for today! You’ll hear from me on Friday!

Getting to know Firenze

not sure how, but the Medici accountant is morphing into Nicholas Cage

I don’t know how I do it, standing up for nine-ish hours everyday drawing and having the energy to explore, but I do. Somehoooooow. It’s been a bit too long since my last post, but I’ve been spending some time with Florence!

Here are some things you might see here:

1. Gelato. Everywhere. There may just be a scrumptious opportunity on every corner, but you have to search out the good stuff. Never buy two scoops for more than €2.
2. Cafes. Also everywhere. Sometimes in the same space as a gelateria. They have other options, but the only good thing is coffee. And there’s a spectrum of quality even within that. Unfortunately I don’t know the best coffee in town, because I do not partake, so I judge a place on its atmosphere. Or, you know, a wireless signal. If you’re ordering anything else (ex: Coke) you’re probably American.
3. Internationals. I don’t mean tourists (although there are many of those too). You are just as likely to run into a Brit as you are an Italian, if not more so. According to my cousin Charles, who has lived here for 40-some years, Florence is the smallest international city by population in the world, so the people you see everyday are most likely from out of town. I think more people speak English than they do in any other non-English country I’ve been to, and I’ve been to so seriously touristy places!
4. Picturesque landmarks. There are many ugly parts of Florence, but the majority of the inner city by the Arno is gorgeous. The tourist destinations and preserved sites are definitely worth the wait, or the money or whatever you think you’re giving up when you’re traveling. On Monday I visited the Boboli Gardens with a couple friends from school and got some pictures which may illustrate my point:

(You may get the Duomo from all of the angles by the end of my stay, fair warning.)

5. Amazing architecture still in use, that may also be covered in art dating back as far as the Renaissance. There are paintings on almost every street, including my little alley way, of the Madonna and Child. Juxtaposed with the grime of streetlife, you get quite a scene. Apparently Florence’s skyline hasn’t so hanged since the fifties, so the view from any apartment building can still get a sight of the surrounding hills.

Things I’ve experienced:

– platform-heeled bicyclists
– leather shops, everywhere
– grandmas riding Vespas
– hen parties in front of the duomo
– gypsies
– baby blue capri suits on men
– street art
– babies in Armani
– tights for men
– amazing food, both from dining out and from the local grocer
– street performers pre-performance

I could write more, but then I’d be sitting here until closing! If you have any question of my travels or would like to request pics or suggest destinations, feel free to comment! Now, to sit and relax and enjoy a little Internet before I head out into the rainy afternoon!

Arrivederci!

Days One & Two: Florence

Hello world!

It’s me again, having embarked on my next foreign adventure: Florence, Italy.

Here’s what’s happening – as of yesterday afternoon (continental Europe time), I am in Florence for a month! I am taking a drawing course at Charles Cecil Studios nearby, and am staying with students of the school while I’m here.

Here are the facts:

I speak *zero* Italian.
I have never taken a formal drawing course in my life.
I have never stayed abroad all by my lonesome. Done it without parents, done it in a non-English speaking country, but never without other students who I had met beforehand.

Believe me, it’s not an introvert’s ideal situation, despite how excited I am to have this opportunity. Regarding my acceptance into a prestigious art school, yes, I know somebody who knows somebody, etc. etc. I am cousins with the founder of the school, who has been so gracious to offer the children in the family drawing lessons. Being the youngest one in my family, I am the last to have this opportunity! I have no idea of the talent I will be surrounded by, and I have no idea how prepared I am.

Did I mention I’m also not incredibly spontaneous? Well, there you are.

My first day, though, was great. We touched down in Florence and enjoyed an evening of extremely (incredibly, amazingly) fine cuisine due to my mother’s presence in Florence my first couple days here. We ate at the Borgo San Jacopo near Ponte Vecchio, the bridge famous for its accompanying buildings suspended over the Fiume. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves. If you have questions about the food, leave a comment! I will tell you though, that the last picture is a tomato ice cream with chocolate “crunchies” and banana. It was indeed bizarre. But awesome, too!

foie gras wafers with apple sorbet and caramel accents
I don't even remember what this was called but it was my favorite dish
tomato ice cream

After dinner we noticed a chamber orchestra playing on the Ponte Vecchio and after further investigation we learned that someone had booked the bridge for the night (!!!) – what a ridiculously Italian thing to hear Vivaldi drifting down the river as the skies darkened and the streets lit up with nightlife.

Ponte Vecchio

Today was a lesson in going with the flow.

Having had minimal contact with my soon-to-be roomies, I informed them I would be showing up at 11am today planning to move in. Funnily enough, my roommates were no-shows, but my cousin appeared on his bicycle and offered to take me and my family out to dinner tonight! Eventually, (1.5 hours later) I was able to get into the flat and get a key.

the view from my flat

(Tip: if you’re staying in a foreign country for more than a week, I recommend getting international phone service, and even a wifi hotspot on your phone if you’re the type to be glued to the Internet – or blogging, as I planned on doing very frequently. As I have neither, this will be sure to be an interesting month.)

And now I’ve unpacked and plan to find an Internet cafe and perhaps a few photo ops before heading to Santa Spirito, if I’m reading my map correctly. Tomorrow is my first drawing class, so there’ll be a post as soon as possible!

Ponte Vecchio

7:56pm Portland/4:57am Frankfurt

As I write this I’m at the point of not knowing quite what day it is or how long I’ve been on this plane, having spent much of the last couple of days in a whirlwind of celebrations of graduation and preparations for the future both immediate and distant. A big group of us choir geeks departed from Portland for SEA-TAC at an unreasonably early hour for the amount of sleep I had the night before, and spent a lovely, bumpy bus ride chattering and/or sleeping, only to get on a 10-hour flight to Frankfurt. From there, we’re destined for Cairo.
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Other than the bus ride, it’s been remarkably smooth-going, aside from the fact that our choir director was the only one to forget her passport in her safety deposit box, and so will be joining us a day later than planned! Don’t worry, we’ve got our assistant director (who I happen to be sitting next to – hello, Charlie!), our accompanist, my previous trip leaders from London (joy), and a classmate’s parents who live in Cairo and have been the main liaisons and reasons for our international tour. Essentially, we’re well taken care of!
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This is to be the first bit of international travel for some of our choir members, which to me is immeasurably exciting! I love sharing my passions with people (especially friends), and one of those passions is experiencing new cultures. It was especially fun to coach people through security. Ha. This time, though, it’s going to be a new and different experience for me, as I’ve only traveled to Europe, Mexico and other English speaking countries. We’ve been preparing to wear headscarves, wear our hair up, and bring modest clothing as well as exercise caution on the streets and to be well-behaved, and although this isn’t necessarily something I wouldn’t do anyway, it’s not something that we as a group (and certainly for some more than others) have had to think about before while at home or abroad). It will be fascinating to see the adjustment process, and to experience it myself.
Once we land in Cairo we’ll be meeting and eating with our home stays, and the day following we’ll be performing in our first concert of the tour! But that’s only after we attend some workshops with the choir at Cairo American College (which is deceptively a high school) and the composer of one of our songs , “Aiyu,” which I have a brief solo in. Oh, and a tour of the Nile. As you do. It’s going to be an exciting start to our tour, unless some other crazy stuff happens during our layover in Frankfurt! I’ll keep you posted.
Expect a set of photos from our first views of Cairo!